Instruction The Gulf Club

VIDEO: Use all your
wedges (not at once)
to knock it close

Learn to swing within yourself and to trust different wedge lofts

By Luke Tidmarsh

From distances of around 100 yards and in you really want to be sticking the ball close and giving yourself a good chance of getting up and down, whether that be for birdie or to save par.

One of the most common problems amateurs have is simply with club selection. When confronted with an 80-yard shot they reach straight for the lob wedge and give it everything they’ve got, sending the ball sky high with very little control – and this is with a well struck shot. Many times this full swing results in a blazing thin through the green or a chunky fat short of it.

My recommendation to solve this problem is to get all of your wedges together and maybe even up to a nine iron, stand on the driving range and make yourself hit a half swing and a three quarter swing with each club and record the average distances that you hit each of them.

It is easy to find yourself picking a target out on the range and hit towards it, but refrain from this as it will change your swing length. Just concentrate solely on your swing length by regulating your shoulder turn.

Once you have done this you will have a number of different yardages that you are able to hit the ball and at varying trajectories. This means you are not just stuck with your big high spinning wedge shot. Not only this, but because you are only doing half and three quarter swings there is a lot less opportunity for mistakes in the swing. Therefore, you are much more likely to be able to repeat your movement and hit the ball the distances you want to. Good luck with the putt!

Luke Tidmarsh is a PGA Professional at Dubai Creek Golf & Yacht Club. To book a lesson, visit www.dubaigolf.com 

Golf Digest Middle East

Golf Digest Middle East

Launched in 2008, Golf Digest Middle East is the #1 golf magazine in the region, featuring local content and exclusive articles from the world's leading professionals

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